Baltimore Sun
Wind Farms Aren't The Answer To Cutting MD's Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Monday, July 25, 2011

Constellation Energy held a ribbon cutting ceremony this week for its new wind farm in Western Maryland. This project is fortunately small compared to what Gov. Martin O'Malley plans for offshore of the Maryland coast and will not present a major increase in the cost of electricity to Maryland residents, but it is a success for the consistently politically correct green politicians.

The problem with wind power is that electricity cannot be stored on an industrial scale, so standby power sources must be available to immediately come on line to make up for periods when the wind doesn't blow or when the wind is blowing too hard. In the former case the windmill simply stops, and in the latter the windmill is shut down to keep the blades from flying off.

Bentek Energy analyzed records from Colorado and Texas, which have significant wind turbine installations. The company concluded that in spite of the large investments, wind turbine installations had a negligible impact on carbon dioxide production. Despite the presence of windmills connected to the grid, Colorado's coal-fired plants produced more carbon dioxide because of repeated cycling in 2009. In Texas, use of wind mills resulted in a slight reduction in carbon dioxide in 2008 and a modest increase in 2009.

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